Change the World

Live in Massachusetts? Vote 'YES' on Ballot Question #3 to Protect Trans Rights

Massachusetts Ballot question #3 would remove "gender identity" from public accommodation non-discrimination law, opening to the door to trans individuals being targeted in public

This November 6th, ballot question #3 in Massachusetts puts transgender individuals at risk of losing their civil rights. In 2016, the state passed a landmark non-discrimination law that prohibits discrimination against trans people in public spaces, including hotels, restaurants, retail stores, gyms, parks, bathrooms, locker rooms and more. But an anti-LGBT group collected enough signatures to put a repeal effort on this ballot this year that, if approved by voters, will remove these protections from public accommodation non-discrimination law.


If that happens, trans people could legally be kicked out of any place open to the public simply for being themselves. Massachusetts would also then be the first state to ever go backwards by removing such protections. This would be horrible for Massachusetts' reputation, businesses and economy. (North Carolina lost an estimated $1 billion due to the passing of legislation requiring individuals to use restrooms and changing facilities that correspond to the sex on their birth certificates.) And most importantly, it would put transgender people at risk! Scary enough, the anti-LGBTQ advocates behind the measure decided to focus on Massachusetts first because they feel confident if they can remove these protections in a liberal state like ours, they can likely do the same in many other states.

Gays With Kids asks that you please inform every Massachusetts resident you know to VOTE YES ON 3! A YES vote will uphold Massachusetts' current non-discrimination laws, which include transgender protections. Please go to www.freedomma.org for more information and to join the coalition of thousands of businesses, communities, civic groups and individuals who are committed to voting YES ON 3.

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Politics

Daughter of Married Gay Couple Who Used Surrogacy Abroad Isn't Citizen, Says U.S. State Department

A decades-old law can be used to discriminate against gay couples who use surrogacy abroad.

James Derek Mize and his husband Jonathan Gregg are both American citizens, but their daughter, born via a surrogate, may not be, at least according to the U.S. State Department.

The New York Times took an in-depth look at this case in a piece that ran in the paper yesterday. While James was born and raised in the U.S, his husband Jonathan was originally born in Britain. That may be enough, according to the State Department, to deny their daughter citizenship.

"We're both Americans; we're married," James told the New York Times. "We just found it really hard to believe that we could have a child that wouldn't be able to be in our country."

According to decades-old immigration law, a child born abroad must have a biological connection to a parent that is a U.S. citizen in order to be eligible to receive citizenship upon birth. Children born via surrogacy are determined to be "out of wedlock," according to the Times report," which then requires a more onerous process to qualify for citizenship, such as demonstrating that a biological parent is not only an American citizen, but has spent at least five years in the country.

The intent of the law, which dates back to the 1950s, was to prevent people from claiming, falsely, that they are the children of U.S. parents. But LGBTQ advocates argue this archaic policy is being used intentionally to discriminates against same-sex couples, who often have to rely on donors, IVF and surrogacy in order to have biologically children, and are thus held to a higher standard.

"This is where our life is. This is where our jobs are," James told the Times. "Our daughter can't be here, but she has no one else to care for her."

Read the whole story here.


Change the World

Pete and Chasten Buttigieg Hope to Have Children "Soon"

Though the 2020 contender hopes to have children "soon," Pete Buttigieg admits his presidential ambitions have "slowed down the path" to becoming a gay dad.

Pete Buttigieg, the ascendant, gay, millennial who hopes to call the White House home after the 2020 election with his husband Chasten, might just be moving in to 1600 Pennsylvania Ave with a baby carriage in tow.

ABC News reports that at a recent rally in Brooklyn, while answering a question on paid family leave, Buttigieg revealed that he and a "personal stake" in whether paid family leave becomes the law of the land nationally, because he and his husband hope to have children "soon."

"We're hoping to have a little one soon, so I have a personal stake in this one, too," Buttigieg said. "We should have paid parental leave and find a way to have paid leave for anyone who needs caring."

Of course, his white house ambitions have "slowed down the path," however, he later told MSNBC in a follow up interview.

Buttigieg also had this to say of his 29-year-old husband, Chasten: "He is a great educator. He has become a great public figure, coming out of the gate. He is going to be an amazing father. I can't wait to see -- I hope I will be good at it, too. I can't wait to see him have that chance."

Predictably, the religious right is already clutching their pearls at the idea.

But gay dads in the White House? I think we could get used to that.

Change the World

Mayor Pete Hopes His (Future) Kids Are "Puzzled" That Coming Out Was Ever Newsworthy

Mayor Pete and husband Chasten don't have any kids yet, but have talked openly and often about their hopes to be dads one day

Pete Buttigieg, who is making waves in the political world by competing to be the first openly gay and (at 37 years old) first Millennial President of the United States, currently doesn't have any children with husband Chasten. But it's clear from his public comments and writings that he and Chasten hope to become dads one day.

And when that day comes, Buttigieg says he hopes his kids will find it puzzling that coming out as gay was ever a newsworthy event. Back in 2015, well before he began his campaign for president, Buttigieg wrote an essay in the South Bend Tribune that said the following:

"Like most people, I would like to get married one day and eventually raise a family. I hope that when my children are old enough to understand politics, they will be puzzled that someone like me revealing he is gay was ever considered to be newsworthy. By then, all the relevant laws and court decisions will be seen as steps along the path to equality. But the true compass that will have guided us there will be the basic regard and concern that we have for one another as fellow human beings — based not on categories of politics, orientation, background, status or creed, but on our shared knowledge that the greatest thing any of us has to offer is love."

In the meantime, Pete and Chasten are kept plenty busy with their two fur babies, Truman and Buddy.


Gay Adoption

5 Ways to Know Your Adoption Agency Is LGBTQ-Friendly

So you're ready to adopt. How do you know your adoption agency won't just discriminate against you as a gay man, but is actively welcoming to LGBTQ people?

You know what is the worst? Adoption agencies who discriminate! So how do you know your agency welcomes you? Check out our list of five immediate ways to know if your agency is LGBTQ affirming.

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Change the World

Gay Dads Featured in Enfamil Commercial

A new ad for Enfamil showcases two gay men talking about their daughter.

The best kind of inclusion is when you're not singled out but instead included right along with everyone else. This kind inclusion inspires others to pursue their own dreams and desires, just like any one else. As part of our popular culture, we know that brands are uniquely suited to inspire us in this way.

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Gay Dad Life

Cooking with Kids: An Interview with David Burtka

David Burtka sits down with us to talk about his new book "Life is a Party."

When you're a young couple it's easy to order in or dine out on a daily basis, but when the kids come along, spending time in the kitchen to prepare nutritious and healthy meals for them can become a problem for some dads. We turned to gay dad and celebrity chef David Burtka who just published his debut recipe book Life is a Party, to get some advice, inspiration, and support as we take our baby steps in the kitchen.

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Popular

Couple That Met at the Gym Now Spotting Each Other Through Fatherhood

How two real New-Yorkers became two soft-hearted dads

This article is part of our family feature series with Circle Surrogacy, a surrogacy agency that has been helping LGBTQ+ singles and couples realize their dream of parenthood for the past 20 years.

Byron and Matthew Slosar, both 41, met ten years ago at one of New York City's Equinox gyms. "I asked him for a spot on the bench press," smiled Byron. The couple were married September 22, 2012.

Surrogacy was always the way Byron and Matthew wanted to become parents. They chose to wait and become dads later in life, until they had established careers and the financial means to pursue their chosen path.

They signed with Circle Surrogacy after interviewing a few agencies. "We immediately connected with their entire staff, particularly Anne Watson who lovingly dealt with my healthy neuroses on the daily for 1.5 years," said Byron. "They definitely personalized the service and helped us understand all 2,000 moving parts." The dads-to-be were also very impressed with how much emotional support they received from Circle.

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Fatherhood, the gay way

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