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Senator Kirsten Gillibrand Puts Parents at Forefront of "LGBTQ Rights Agenda"

The New York Senator, currently vying for the Democratic nomination for President, has released detail policy proposals in recent months to protect LGBTQ parents and children

Just in time for Pride month, Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, who is currently vying for the Democratic nomination for President in 2020, released her LGBTQ policy platform via a post on Medium. While most Democrats in the 2020 have given at least lip service to supporting LGBTQ rights (which itself is a remarkable feat, particularly when compared to the Democratic field in 2008), Senator Gillibrand's platform is detailed in scope, including a primary focus on the needs of LGBTQ parents and their kids.

The New York Senator starts by saying she would shore up protections for marriage equality. "I was proud to be one of the first senators to support marriage equality," she writes. "As president ... I would also move to permanently codify marriage equality as the law of the land and ensure that Obergefell v. Hodges can never be overturned."

She goes on to note that marriage is "just the beginning." In a similar post on Medium, issued in May of this year, Gillibrand released her "Family Bill of Rights." In that policy platform, Gillibrand says she'll fight for the right of every person to "give birth or adopt a child, regardless of your income or sexual orientation." She would seek to shore up legal protections through the passage of the Every Child Deserves a Family Act, which would prohibit taxpayer-funded adoption and child welfare agencies from discriminating against LGBTQ foster or adoptive families. But she would also move to require insurance companies to cover fertility treatments like IVF for "families, including LGBTQ couples, who can't get pregnant independently."

Lastly, she would require "hospitals in every state offer a gender-neutral parental form to ensure that both members of a same-sex couple can secure their parental rights from the day their child is born. You shouldn't have to adopt your own child just because of your gender."

We look forward to covering the detailed LGBTQ policy agendas of other 2020 contenders as they become available.

Change the World

Republican Utah Lawmaker, and Dad of Two, Comes Out as Gay in Moving Video

Nathan Ivie has many important identities he's proud of: Mormon, Republican, Utahn, father of two... and gay.

In a moving video posted to Facebook, Republican lawmaker Nathan Ivie finally admitted publicly something he's known since the age of 9: he's gay. Ivie, who serves as a County commissioner, is now the first openly gay Republican elected official in the state of Utah. His coming out video has already been viewed more than 25,000 times:

"There's no easy way to say this, I might as well just jump up and say it: I'm gay," Ivie says in the video. "That's my reality and that's what I need to talk to you about today."

In the video, Ivie reveals that he and his wife has separated. He refers to her as his "best friend and supporter," however, and that he is continuing to co-parent their two children with her.

"It's ok to be different, it's ok to live authentically," Ivie says in his video. "You can be gay and a Republican. You need to trust that people will love you for who you really are."

Jackie Biskupski, Salt Lake City's openly lesbian Democratic mayor, praised Ivie via Twitter, writing: "All the best to you, I love how a simple act of love among strangers helped you find your truth and that you are being embraced by family and friends."

Politics

Daughter of Married Gay Couple Who Used Surrogacy Abroad Isn't Citizen, Says U.S. State Department

A decades-old law can be used to discriminate against gay couples who use surrogacy abroad.

James Derek Mize and his husband Jonathan Gregg are both American citizens, but their daughter, born via a surrogate, may not be, at least according to the U.S. State Department.

The New York Times took an in-depth look at this case in a piece that ran in the paper yesterday. While James was born and raised in the U.S, his husband Jonathan was originally born in Britain. That may be enough, according to the State Department, to deny their daughter citizenship.

"We're both Americans; we're married," James told the New York Times. "We just found it really hard to believe that we could have a child that wouldn't be able to be in our country."

According to decades-old immigration law, a child born abroad must have a biological connection to a parent that is a U.S. citizen in order to be eligible to receive citizenship upon birth. Children born via surrogacy are determined to be "out of wedlock," according to the Times report," which then requires a more onerous process to qualify for citizenship, such as demonstrating that a biological parent is not only an American citizen, but has spent at least five years in the country.

The intent of the law, which dates back to the 1950s, was to prevent people from claiming, falsely, that they are the children of U.S. parents. But LGBTQ advocates argue this archaic policy is being used intentionally to discriminates against same-sex couples, who often have to rely on donors, IVF and surrogacy in order to have biologically children, and are thus held to a higher standard.

"This is where our life is. This is where our jobs are," James told the Times. "Our daughter can't be here, but she has no one else to care for her."

Read the whole story here.


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Pete and Chasten Buttigieg Hope to Have Children "Soon"

Though the 2020 contender hopes to have children "soon," Pete Buttigieg admits his presidential ambitions have "slowed down the path" to becoming a gay dad.

Pete Buttigieg, the ascendant, gay, millennial who hopes to call the White House home after the 2020 election with his husband Chasten, might just be moving in to 1600 Pennsylvania Ave with a baby carriage in tow.

ABC News reports that at a recent rally in Brooklyn, while answering a question on paid family leave, Buttigieg revealed that he and a "personal stake" in whether paid family leave becomes the law of the land nationally, because he and his husband hope to have children "soon."

"We're hoping to have a little one soon, so I have a personal stake in this one, too," Buttigieg said. "We should have paid parental leave and find a way to have paid leave for anyone who needs caring."

Of course, his white house ambitions have "slowed down the path," however, he later told MSNBC in a follow up interview.

Buttigieg also had this to say of his 29-year-old husband, Chasten: "He is a great educator. He has become a great public figure, coming out of the gate. He is going to be an amazing father. I can't wait to see -- I hope I will be good at it, too. I can't wait to see him have that chance."

Predictably, the religious right is already clutching their pearls at the idea.

But gay dads in the White House? I think we could get used to that.

Change the World

Mayor Pete Hopes His (Future) Kids Are "Puzzled" That Coming Out Was Ever Newsworthy

Mayor Pete and husband Chasten don't have any kids yet, but have talked openly and often about their hopes to be dads one day

Pete Buttigieg, who is making waves in the political world by competing to be the first openly gay and (at 37 years old) first Millennial President of the United States, currently doesn't have any children with husband Chasten. But it's clear from his public comments and writings that he and Chasten hope to become dads one day.

And when that day comes, Buttigieg says he hopes his kids will find it puzzling that coming out as gay was ever a newsworthy event. Back in 2015, well before he began his campaign for president, Buttigieg wrote an essay in the South Bend Tribune that said the following:

"Like most people, I would like to get married one day and eventually raise a family. I hope that when my children are old enough to understand politics, they will be puzzled that someone like me revealing he is gay was ever considered to be newsworthy. By then, all the relevant laws and court decisions will be seen as steps along the path to equality. But the true compass that will have guided us there will be the basic regard and concern that we have for one another as fellow human beings — based not on categories of politics, orientation, background, status or creed, but on our shared knowledge that the greatest thing any of us has to offer is love."

In the meantime, Pete and Chasten are kept plenty busy with their two fur babies, Truman and Buddy.


Change the World

Meet the Gay Dad Running For Common Council in South Bend, Indiana

Move over Mayor Pete Buttigieg! South Bend, Indiana may soon have another gay politico in the form of Alex Giorgio-Rubin, a dad of a 12-year-old adopted son.

You've probably heard of Pete Buttigieg, the young gay mayor running to be the Democratic nominee to challenge President Trump in 2020. But the town of South Bend, Indiana, may soon have another gay politico rising star in the form of Alex Giorgio-Rubin, a dad to a 12-year-old son.

Alex is running for a seat on South Bend's Common Council, in part, he says, to help make all families – including ones like his own – feel welcome.

As an out, married, gay dad, living in a Jewish household, raising a son who is on the Autism spectrum, Alex feels he can offer a unique perspective. "We come from the state that produced Mike Pence," said Alex. "We come from the state that made national headlines because of a bill that would allow businesses to discriminate based on sexual orientation; it's fair to say that the cards are stacked against my family, and many, many other families like mine."

Alex, who is currently a stay-at-home dad raising his adopted son, 12-year-old Joseph, is married to Joshua Giorgio-Rubin, a Senior English Lecturer at the Indiana University of South Bend. The two have been together for six years.

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Change the World

There's No "LGBT Way" to Change a Diaper, Says America's First Gay Dad Governor

Jared Polis, the first openly gay male Governor of a state, talks to POPSUGAR about how being a dad has impacted his policy priorities

Colorado Governor Jared Polis recently say down with POPSUGAR for an interview to talk politics, family life, and what it's like being the first openly gay man to ascend to a state's top executive role.

Though this is a historic moment for the LGBTQ community, and gay dads in particular, Governor Polis says the act of parenting his two children with a male partner, Marlon Reis, doesn't change all that much . Or, as he more succinctly put it, "there's no LGBT way to change a kid's diaper. Or dress your kid for school."

His experience as a parent, though, has impacted some of his policy priorities. "My vision for Colorado is about making Colorado more livable for all families," Polis told POPSUGAR. One of the primary ways he hopes to do so is through family-friendly education policies, like early childhood education.

"The data always pointed to the importance of early childhood education," he says in the interview. "But now as a father of a 7-year-old and a 4-year-old, I really see it in my own kids. I see the difference that preschool and kindergarten can make and how fortunate I am to have been able to afford that for my kids."

Governor Polis is also interested in enacting paid family leave policies that are more inclusive of dads. "We want our state to be the best state to raise a family," he said. "Part of that is making sure new parents can be with their kids in those precious first few weeks that you never get back."

Read the entire interview here.


Change the World

Twin Son of Gay Married Couple Recognized as U.S. Citizen by Federal Judge

According to the decision by U.S. District Judge John F. Walter, a child does not need to show a biological relationship to their parents if their parents were married at the time of their birth.

According to Metro Weekly, a federal judge in California has ruled that "a twin son of a gay married couple has been an American citizen since birth, extending to him the same rights and protections that his biological half-brother already enjoyed."

Previously, the U.S. State Department denied citizenship to one of the twins, Ethan Dvash-Banks, whose biological father, Elad Dvash-Banks, is an Israeli national and not a U.S. citizen. Ethan's twin brother, Aiden, was conceived via the same donor egg, but from sperm from a different father, Andrew Dvash-Banks, who does have U.S. citizenship. As a result, Aiden was recognized as a U.S. citizen while his twin brother, Ethan, was not.

The couple worked with LGBTQ legal group Immigration Equality to fight the decision, who helped effectively argue to U.S. District Judge John F. Walter that U.S. law should not require a child to show a biological relationship to their parents if their parents were married at the time of their birth.

Read the whole article here and then check out the emotional video posted by the Dvash-Banks family to YouTube following the decision below:


A Message of Gratitude from the Dvash-Banks Family youtu.be

Fatherhood, the gay way

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