Gay Dad Life

New Book Explores How Two 'Broken Souls' Met on Craigslist, Fell in Love, and Started a Family

Nick and Bryan had both almost "given up," until they met each other through a Craigslist ad.

Guest post written by Nick He, authors of "Two Dads and Three Girls"

My name is Nick. I am 100% made in China. Growing up in China, being gay was not an option. I was denied a chance to be myself. Thanks to the Chinese education system, I also was not encouraged to seek my true self. Everyday, I was told to study, get a good score, go to a college, and to make my parents proud.

Growing up in Seattle, Bryan's happy family life was shattered by his parent's divorce. He quit college and worked in a local grocery store for 18 years. He knew that he liked boys when he was little, but chose to live a faked straight life.

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Gay Dad Life

"Over the Moon": Congrats to Gay Dads on May Births and Adoptions!

Join us in congratulating all of the gay men in our community whose families grew in the Month of May!

Wishing all of these gay dads congratulations on their exciting news this month. From pregnancy announcements, to becoming first-time dads, congrats to everyone in our community on their recent births and adoptions!

Circle Surrogacy is the proud sponsor of May's Congrats post. They were founded in 1995 on the belief that everyone should have the opportunity to be a parent. "For over 20 years we've helped LGBTQ+ couples and singles around the world fulfill their dreams of parenthood. We've helped bring more than 1,900 babies into this world... and counting!"

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Gay Dad Family Stories

Triple the Fun (and Diapers): Chris and Shimon, on Life With Their Triplets

When their triplets were born via surrogacy, Chris and Shimon's doctor said he'd never had so many people in one delivery room

Chris Corbett was on holiday in South Africa when Shimon Bobbout first saw him. "I was with a group of friends," recalled Shimon, "and as soon as he walked in, all of us literally looked at each other and said, 'Who's the dish?'" The two clicked right away.

Chris, who was based in Sydney, was in South Africa visiting his mom. Shimon and Chris enjoyed a holiday romance that resulted in a very special simultaneous connection. "I had mentioned to Chris that I was looking to start a family, thinking at the back of my mind that he would run for the hills," said Shimon. "However, he totally surprised me with such support and shared that he had the exact same intensions."

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Personal Essays by Gay Dads

This Guy Refused to Wait for His Prince Charming Before Becoming a Dad

Most coverage of LGBTQ parents features couples, says our new blogger Steven Kerr. As a single man, that doesn't represent his experience.

I sat nervously in the car with my mother and father. It had taken almost four years to arrive at this moment. I had parked just around the corner from the convent, knowing that in just a few minutes I would meet my new daughter for the very first time.

I received the call two days prior. I had been shopping in the centre of town when I saw the missed call just as my phone died. I rushed home to plug in the phone and access the voicemail. It was June 2009.

"Hello Steven. This is Teresa from the adoptions department. We have an 'indecent' proposal for you. Can you come in before 2pm to discuss?".

I looked at my watch. It was 1:45pm. I drove like a madman retracing my steps back to the council offices to receive their proposal.

Now three days later sitting in my small, black Fiat Punto, I was nervously trying to get my head around the events of the past 48 hours, yearning to hold my daughter in my arms for the first time.

Little did I know that the nuns had no plans on handing over my daughter that morning…

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Politics

Daughter of Married Gay Couple Who Used Surrogacy Abroad Isn't Citizen, Says U.S. State Department

A decades-old law can be used to discriminate against gay couples who use surrogacy abroad.

James Derek Mize and his husband Jonathan Gregg are both American citizens, but their daughter, born via a surrogate, may not be, at least according to the U.S. State Department.

The New York Times took an in-depth look at this case in a piece that ran in the paper yesterday. While James was born and raised in the U.S, his husband Jonathan was originally born in Britain. That may be enough, according to the State Department, to deny their daughter citizenship.

"We're both Americans; we're married," James told the New York Times. "We just found it really hard to believe that we could have a child that wouldn't be able to be in our country."

According to decades-old immigration law, a child born abroad must have a biological connection to a parent that is a U.S. citizen in order to be eligible to receive citizenship upon birth. Children born via surrogacy are determined to be "out of wedlock," according to the Times report," which then requires a more onerous process to qualify for citizenship, such as demonstrating that a biological parent is not only an American citizen, but has spent at least five years in the country.

The intent of the law, which dates back to the 1950s, was to prevent people from claiming, falsely, that they are the children of U.S. parents. But LGBTQ advocates argue this archaic policy is being used intentionally to discriminates against same-sex couples, who often have to rely on donors, IVF and surrogacy in order to have biologically children, and are thus held to a higher standard.

"This is where our life is. This is where our jobs are," James told the Times. "Our daughter can't be here, but she has no one else to care for her."

Read the whole story here.


Gay Dad Life

In the U.K.? Join These Dads at Events Supporting LGBTQ Parents!

The dads behind the blog TwoDads.U.K are ramping up their support of other LGBTQ parents. Check out these events they're a part of!

What a couple of years it's been for us! When our daughter Talulah was born via UK surrogacy back in October 2016, we decided to take to Instagram and Facebook to document the parental highs and lows. Little did we expect for it to be where it is now. We always had the ambition to help other intended fathers understand more about surrogacy, and we also had the added driver to do our best to influence others – help open some of the closed minds with regards to same-sex parenting.

Here we are now, pregnant again with our son which we revealed Live on Facebook! We're due in August, we're now writing several blogs, social media influencers and launching a new business focusing on our main mission to support others and being advocates for UK surrogacy. It's no wonder we're shattered!

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Gay Dad Life

Chinese App 'Bluedbaby' Helps Gay Men Navigate Surrogacy in the U.S.

The service, Bluedbaby, started as a dating app for gay Chinese men.

Bloomberg Businessweek recently ran a story about Geng Le, a gay man from China's Hebei province who launched a gay dating app called Blued. Geng became a father with the help of a surrogacy agency in California in March 2017, and is now using his app to help other gay Chinese men start their families, too.

The app was doing well, even prior to using the app for family planning purposes. Bloomberg reports the app had 40 million users and $130 million in venture capital. But he figured many of these users, like him, would be interested in pursuing surrogacy abroad. So he launched Bluedbaby to help others navigate the complicated system.

The article goes into detail on Geng's interesting personal story. Geng was employed as a police officer and married to a woman while he secretly launched his gay dating app. After he was outed, his employed said he could keep his job if he shut down the website. He decided to quit instead, and pursue the app full time as an out gay man. His outing was difficult on he and his parents, who were shocked to learn their son was gay.

With little to lose, he began focusing all of his efforts on Blued, believing demographics were on his side. "We believe that all human beings are alike, so China, with 1.4 billion people, could potentially have 140 million LGBT members," he told Bloomberg. "Hence you have a large enough community to support an entire economy of its own."

Bluedbaby is meant to help Chinese men navigate difficult decisions involved in surrogacy journeys, such as where and how to select an egg donor or surrogate, and help with signing surrogacy contracts. The service isn't cheap, running thousands of dollars on top of the costs associated with a normal surrogacy journey. But he hopes the service will help some Chinese gay men start to fulfill their dreams of starting families.

"If, like me, you're in your 40s and you still haven't married, you still don't have children, how can you face your parents, how can your parents face their friends?" Geng told Bloomberg. "The regret is that your life isn't complete enough. The second regret is that you owe a debt to your parents."

Read the whole article here.

Become a Gay Dad

Jewish Agency to Help Cover the Costs of Surrogacy for Gay Couples

Isaac Herzog, of the Jewish Agency's Chairman of the Executive, has made it a priority to support employees family-planning journeys, regardless of their sexual orientation or gender identity.

According to an article in the Jerusalem Post, the Jewish Agency for Israel is about to become first state organization to provide financial assistance to gay employees seeking child surrogacy services overseas. The move is intended to help offset the high costs associated with conducting surrogacy abroad.

The move to do so was led by Isaac Herzog, the Jewish Agency's Chairman of the Executive, who has made it a priority to support employees family-planning journeys, regardless of their sexual orientation or gender identity. The decision will apply to the agency's roughly 1,250 employees. The loans can be used to help cover the costs of necessary medical procedures before surrogacy, and for the process of surrogacy itself, the article notes.

Last year, in a controversial move, the Israeli government expanded the ability of single women to access surrogacy services in the country, but excluded single men and gay couples from the policy.

Herzog said the following in announcing the new initiative:

"We are also making a symbolic statement, because it reflects the egalitarian stance of a large organization that is recognizing the right of every man or woman to actualize their wish to be parents and to raise a family, regardless of gender identity or sexual orientation. The Jewish Agency is one big family, and all its members are equal."

Fatherhood, the gay way

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