Gay Dad Life

Netflix Documentary Explores a Gay Chinese-American's Path to Parenthood Via Surrogacy

"All In My Family," a new short documentary by filmmaker Hao Wu, explores his family's struggle to accept his sexuality and decision to pursue surrogacy in the United States

Filmmaker Hao Wu's latest documentary, released on Netflix this past week, explores his coming out story and his path to becoming a gay dad via surrogacy in the United States. Viewers watch as Wu comes out to his Chinese parents, who are not accepting of his sexual orientation.

As the film's synopsis notes, Wu, the only male descendant in his Chinese family, was "raised with a certain set of expectations - excel at school, get a good job, marry, and have kids." He achieves each of these goals, but as a gay man, he hasn't done so in the way his family had hoped. The film follows Wu brings his husband and children to China to meet his family, many of who are still unaware of his sexual orientation.

"I wanted to show the challenges for gay people of Chinese descent, what kind of cultural and generational barriers and differences they have to negotiate in order to build a family of their own," Wu said in an interview with InkStone.

Watch the moving documentary in full here.


Gay Dad Life

Chinese App 'Bluedbaby' Helps Gay Men Navigate Surrogacy in the U.S.

The service, Bluedbaby, started as a dating app for gay Chinese men.

Bloomberg Businessweek recently ran a story about Geng Le, a gay man from China's Hebei province who launched a gay dating app called Blued. Geng became a father with the help of a surrogacy agency in California in March 2017, and is now using his app to help other gay Chinese men start their families, too.

The app was doing well, even prior to using the app for family planning purposes. Bloomberg reports the app had 40 million users and $130 million in venture capital. But he figured many of these users, like him, would be interested in pursuing surrogacy abroad. So he launched Bluedbaby to help others navigate the complicated system.

The article goes into detail on Geng's interesting personal story. Geng was employed as a police officer and married to a woman while he secretly launched his gay dating app. After he was outed, his employed said he could keep his job if he shut down the website. He decided to quit instead, and pursue the app full time as an out gay man. His outing was difficult on he and his parents, who were shocked to learn their son was gay.

With little to lose, he began focusing all of his efforts on Blued, believing demographics were on his side. "We believe that all human beings are alike, so China, with 1.4 billion people, could potentially have 140 million LGBT members," he told Bloomberg. "Hence you have a large enough community to support an entire economy of its own."

Bluedbaby is meant to help Chinese men navigate difficult decisions involved in surrogacy journeys, such as where and how to select an egg donor or surrogate, and help with signing surrogacy contracts. The service isn't cheap, running thousands of dollars on top of the costs associated with a normal surrogacy journey. But he hopes the service will help some Chinese gay men start to fulfill their dreams of starting families.

"If, like me, you're in your 40s and you still haven't married, you still don't have children, how can you face your parents, how can your parents face their friends?" Geng told Bloomberg. "The regret is that your life isn't complete enough. The second regret is that you owe a debt to your parents."

Read the whole article here.

Fatherhood, the gay way

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