Gay Dad Life

Six Lessons for New Gay Dads

After making it to the six month mark with baby Sloane, Dave and Bart have some lessons to share with other new gay dads. Check out this month's installment of "Two Men and a Baby."

Six months down! We've scaled Peak Fussiness and made it down the other side. While other new parents often warn us "don't blink because they grow up so fast," if we're being honest with ourselves it often feels like the total opposite, as if our lives Pre-Sloane (or P.S. as we like to call it) happened a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away. Leisurely brunches. Impromptu vacations. Whiling away entire afternoons sprawled out on the couch binge-watching episodes of BoJack Horseman.


While a part of us misses those P.S. days, A.S. is not without its many pleasures, though they're of a different sort: walking into our daughter's nursery every morning and being greeted by the biggest smile ever, our little girl so excited to experience another day. Watching her eyes light up when she finally figures how to use the musical keyboard thingy attached to her activity jumper. Getting her to giggle hysterically when we make fart noises with our mouths against her belly.

And it's not just our day-to-day routine that's changed, but we're being rewired as well. We've become better planners, charting out Sloane's feedings before we step foot out of our apartment. We're way more patient… most of the time. And at the deepest level, we finally understand what it means to be truly and utterly selfless, to put another human life before our own, ensuring Sloane is well-fed before we take our first bite, that she's comfortably asleep before we crash after a long day at work.

The first six months haven't been easy by any stretch of the imagination. But it's also kinda awesome to reflect how much we've grown since those first few weeks as new parents, when we were bumbling around in a sleep-induced haze with no frickin' clue what we were doing. On that note, we wanted to share six things we learnt from the first six months. And we can't wait to see what the next few months with Sloane will bring!

Thanks for watching,

Dave and Bart

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Fatherhood, the gay way

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