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Five Surprising Facts about Same-Sex Adoption in the United States

Maybe you've gone through the adoption process already and fancy yourself an expert on the topic. But how many of these lesser known and surprising facts about LGBTQ adoption did you know?

#1: More Same-Sex Couples in Mississippi are Raising Children Than Any Other State

Mississippi was the last state in the country to legalize same-sex adoption. However, more LGBT couples are raising children in the Magnolia State than in any other in the country! According to the Williams Institute at the UCLA School of Law, 27 percent of same-sex couples in Mississippi are raising children. The District of Columbia ranks last, with 9 percent of same-sex couples raising children.

#2: Gay Couples Are Four Times More Likely to Adopt

Same-sex couples are four times more likely than straight couples to be raising an adopted child. In fact, in the United States around 16,000 same-sex couples are raising more than 22,000 adopted children.

#3: LGBTQ Parents are More Likely to Adopt a Child of a Different Race

Same-sex parents are more likely to adopt a child of a different race than straight couples. One reason for this is that LGBT individuals are also more likely to be involved in an interracial couple than heterosexual couples.

#4: Americans Are More Supportive of LGBTQ Adoption Than Marriage

Americans are more likely to support adoption rights for LGBT people than marriage rights. In 2014, the last year Gallup polled on the issue, 63 percent of respondents supported the ability of LGBT couples to adopt. That same year, 55 percent of respondents said they supported marriage rights. (In 2016, Gallup found support for same-sex marriage had grown to 61 percent.)

#5: Children Are Just As Well Off With LGBTQ Parents

The largest peer-reviewed study on the subject of LGBTQ parenting found there is no difference in the wellbeing of children raised in same-sex versus opposite-sex headed households. And in fact, some studies have found slight benefits in emotional stability and physical health for children raised in same-sex households!

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