Change the World

Marriott's New Ad Features a Gay Dad Family

Another influential company, hotel conglomerate Marriott, is showcasing our families in their latest ad! And it gets better: It's the family of one of our very own bloggers, Ian Colvin.


The ad features Ian and his husband Darryl, with their arms wide open, as their daughter rushes to greet her two dads.

The ad is called "Human | Golden Rule" and is currently on Marriott's YouTube channel.

"It would be glorious if neighbors were neighborly," a voiceover says as the ad begins to feature Ian and his family. "And difference a forgotten word."

Their new hashtag #GoldenRule elaborates further: "Treating others like we'd like to be treated."

Ian, whose agent connected him with the campaign, spoke with Gays With Kids about the importance of his family's visibility in the campaign.

"All my life I've wanted to be a dad," shared Ian, "But growing up, knowing I was gay, I didn't see what my family might look like, in any forms of media. It's wonderful to see how far we've come, where companies and brands are including gay dads as an important part of their narrative."

"We are so proud our family gets to play a small part in this campaign. The messages of kindness, respect and inclusion are extremely timely."

Watch the full ad below.

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Gay Dad Life

Gay Dads Featured in New AT&T Ad

AT&T is the latest company to feature gay dads in their advertising so far this year!

I hope this becomes the norm that we regularly see brand advertising featuring gay dads. And I hope it becomes so much the norm that I don't feel compelled to write about it anymore!

We're getting there, little by little.

Mega-brand AT&T just released a short video/commercial that features two protective dads making sure that their babysitter is equipped to take care of their children. What strikes me most about this spot is the normalcy. These are simply two normal parents, regardless of gender, who are making sure their children will be properly watched. No stereotypes, no big messaging, no big deal. Just two men being protective parents.

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Change the World

"I Got Milk" Has Now Got Gay Dads

"Milk" just released a new campaign featuring real families, including gay dads.

The original "Got Milk?" campaign that launched in 1993 has gone down in marketing history as one of the most successful programs in branding. After the initial launch of a classic tv commercial that introduced the concept, the campaign later centered around celebrity spokespeople wearing a milk mustache. In the world of marketing, the longevity of the campaign is indeed one for the record books.


Original "got milk?" commercial - Who shot Alexander Hamilton? www.youtube.com

Well now it looks like "Got Milk?" is getting a bit more real with a new campaign featuring real life moments with a variety of families, sans any celebrities.

In the campaign, we see families of all types, including gay dads. Gay dads! No single type of family is singled out, which I think adds to the power of the messaging. By normalizing all different kinds of families, the "brand" is showing inclusion and reality.

And for that I say thank you to milk!

Milk Love What's Real :30 www.youtube.com

Gay Dad Life

Where's All of the Gay Dad-vertising?

A future gay dad's observations (and worries) about mom-centric marketing.

Do you remember that beautiful commercial with the dads changing their baby's diaper and then the narrator says, "The only thing that's better than one dad, is two dads?"

No? Neither do I.

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How This Dad 'Redesigned' the Holidays After Coming Out of the Closet

Rick Clemons describes how he made the holidays work for him and his family again after coming out of the closet

What I'm about to describe to you, is something I am deeply ashamed of in hindsight. I was a jerk, still in a state of shock and confusion, and "in love" with a handsome Brit I'd only spent less than 24 hours with.

I was standing in the Ontario, California airport watching my wife walk with my two daughters to a different gate than mine. They were headed to my parents in the Napa Valley for Thanksgiving. I was headed to spend my Thanksgiving with the Brit in San Francisco. It was less than one month after I had come out of the closet and I was so caught up in my own freedom and new life that I didn't realize until everything went kaput with the Brit on New Year's Eve, that if I was ever going to manage the holidays with dignity and respect for me, my kids, and their Mom, I was going to have to kick myself in the pants and stop acting like a kid in the candy store when it came to men. Ok, nothing wrong with acting that way since I never got to date guys in high school and college because I was raised to believe – gay no way, was the way. But that's another article all together.

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What to Buy

Shop with a Purpose with Our 2019 Holiday Gift Guide

Want to find amazing gift ideas while *also* supporting LGBTQ-owned and allied businesses? Look no further than our 2019 holiday gift guide!

'Tis the season to show loved ones you care. And what better way to show you care, by also supported our LGBTQ+ community and allies whilst doing it! Shop (LGBTQ+) smart with these great suggestions below.

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A Newly Out Gay Dad Feels 'Demoted' After Divorce

Cameron Call showed up to his first family Thanksgiving since coming out and getting a divorce — and struggles to find himself "stuck with the singles."

Cameron Call, who came out in summer 2019, has generously agreed to chronicle his coming out journey for Gays With Kids over the next several months — the highs, lows and everything in between. Read his first article here.

Denial is an interesting thing. It's easy to think you're potentially above it, avoiding it, assume it doesn't apply to you because you'd NEVER do that, or maybe you're just simply avoiding it altogether. After finally coming out, I liked to think that I was done denying anything from now on. But unfortunately that's not the case.

And this fact became very clear to me over Thanksgiving.

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Resources

New Report Details the 'Price of Parenthood' for LGBTQ People

A new report by the Family Equality Council takes a deep dive into the current state of cost for becoming a parent as an LGBTQ person

Parenthood is expensive. But parenthood while queer is still prohibitively costly for so many segments of the LGBTQ community interested in pursuing a family, according to a new repot by the Family Equality Council, titled, "Building LGBTQ+ Families: The Price of Parenthood."

Among the more interesting findings was this one: the cost of family planning is relatively similar for all LGBTQ people, regardless of income level. This shows "that the desire to have children exists regardless of financial security," the report's authors conclude.

Research for the report was conducted through an online survey of 500 LGBTQ adults over the age of 18, and was conducted between July 11-18, 2018. For comparison, the survey also included 1,004 adults who did not identify as LGBTQ.

Other interesting findings of the report include:

  • 29% of all LGBTQ+ respondents reported an annual household income under $25,000 compared to 22% of non-LGBTQ+ respondents.
  • 33% of black LGBTQ+ respondents, 32% of female-identified LGBTQ+ respondents, and 31% of trans/gender non-conforming LGBTQ+ respondents reported annual household incomes below $25,000.
  • Respondents for this survey were selected from among those who have volunteered to participate in online surveys and polls. All sample surveys and polls may be subject to multiple sources of error, including, but not limited to sampling error, coverage error, error associated with nonresponse, and error associated with question-wording and response options.29% of all LGBTQ+ respondents reported an annual household income under $25,000 compared to 22% of non-LGBTQ+ respondents.
  • 33% of black LGBTQ+ respondents, 32% of female-identified LGBTQ+ respondents, and 31% of trans/gender non-conforming LGBTQ+ respondents reported annual household incomes below $25,000.
  • Regardless of annual household income, 45-53% of LGBTQ+ millennials are planning to become parents for the first time or add another child to their family. Those making less than $25,000 a year are considering becoming parents at very similar rates as those making over $100,000.
  • Data from the Family Building Survey reveals that LGBTQ+ households making over $100,000 annually are considering the full range of paths to parenthood, from surrogacy and private adoption to foster care and IVF. The most popular options under consideration in this income bracket are private adoption (74% are considering), foster care (42%), and IVF or reciprocal IVF (21%). At the other end of the economic spectrum, for LGBTQ+ individuals in households making less than $25,000 annually, the most commonly considered paths to parenthood are intercourse (35% are considering), foster care (30%), and adoption (23%).

Fatherhood, the gay way

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