What to Buy

A Gift Guide for LGBTQ Inclusive Children's Books

Need some ideas for good LGBTQ-inclusive children's books? Look no further than our gift guide!

Every year we see more books released that feature our families, and we're here for it! We're especially excited for the day when diverse and LGBTQ+ inclusive books are less of "the odd one out" and rather considered part of every kids' everyday literacy.

To help us reach that day, we need to keep supporting our community and allies who write these stories. So here's a list of some of the great books that need to be in your library, and gifts to the other kids in your lives.


The True Colors of a Princess - Coloring Book

Written by gay dad Mark Loewen

"These coloring pages encourage kids to think beyond the stereotype of a princess and find strength and courage inside themselves. They will color along as Chloe tells the story of how she discovered that princesses are more than just beauty and glitter.

Princesses can be smart, kind, brave, assertive, and determined. Princesses look all kinds of ways. They come from all parts of the world, and from all kinds of families."

Buy here.

Some People Do

Written by gay dad Frank Lowe

"As a parent, discussing diversity with your child can be difficult, especially if you have your own questions. Some People Do boils this topic down to provide the simplest of answers. By the time your child finishes reading this book, they will have been introduced to all facets of people, without any one being more revered than the other."

Buy here.

I Am Perfectly Designed

Written by gay dad and Queer Eye's Fab Five Karamo Brown and his son, Jason Brown

That mantra is now a Children's Book, cowritten by Karamo and his 22-year-old son, Jason, who used to "say things like, 'I don't want to be me, I wish I was someone else, I wish I had a different life." As a parent, that "broke my heart," Karamo told Yahoo! Lifestyle. "I would say to him, 'You are blessed and you are perfect just the way you are,' as a reminder that you have been given so much and you should be appreciative and know that you're enough — I know that the world will try to tear you down, but if you can say to yourself, 'I am perfectly designed,' maybe it can quiet out some of those negative messages."

Buy here.

Fridays with Fitz: Fitz Goes to the Pool

Written by grandparent Tracey Wimperly, proud grandma of a gay son

"I've recently written a children's picture book (aimed at 2-4 year olds) called "Fridays with Fitz: Fitz Goes to the Pool." Every Friday - when his two dads go to work - Fitz and his grandparents (my husband, Steve and I) head off on an adventure. Through the eyes of a curious and energetic 3 year old, even ordinary adventures, like riding the bus or foraging for fungus in the forest can be fun and magical."

Buy here.

Milo's Adventure: A Mermaid's Tale

Written by gay dads BJ Barone and Frankie Nelson

"A Mermaid's Tale is a story of a little boy's love for toys and wanting to have fun! After being told that boys don't play with dolls, we decided to make this a teachable moment and open up the dialogue around gender norms and stereotypes. In the end, toys are toys. Let kids be kids."

Buy here.

Ready or Not, Here Comes [Kid's Name]

Written by two moms Keren and Noa of Mememe Press

"It all started when co-founders Keren and Noa couldn't find a book for their daughter that featured a family like theirs. Not a book with point or an agenda. A real book. A book that made you want to curl up and thumb the pages again and again.

Children's author's Kate and Jol Temple felt the same way. Whether your family has two moms, a mom and a dad or maybe a grandma, four brothers and a cat, there should be a book just about them."

Buy here.

Maiden and Princess

Written by Daniel Haack and Isabel Galupo, published in partnership with GLAAD

"Once in a faraway kingdom, a strong, brave maiden is invited to attend the prince's royal ball, but she's not as excited to go as everyone else. After her mother convinces her to make an appearance, she makes a huge impression on everyone present, from the villagers to the king and queen, but she ends up finding true love in a most surprising place. This book is published in partnership with GLAAD to accelerate LGBTQ inclusivity and acceptance."

The follow up book to the popular "Prince and Knight"

Buy here.

Spirit Day

Written by Little Bee Books, in partnership with GLAAD

"Spirit Day is an annual LGBTQ awareness day established in 2010 to rally people against bullying. Spirit Day reinforces the importance of kindness, while also providing young readers with strategies to be a supportive friend. Published and created in partnership with GLAAD, this book aims to accelerate LGBTQ inclusivity and acceptance."

Buy here.

They, She, He, easy as ABC

Written by Maya Christina Gonzalez and Matthew SG

"They, She, He easy as ABC shows that including everyone is all part of the dance. It's easy. It's fundamental. As the dance begins the kids proclaim, "No one left out and everyone free," in a sing-song rhyme about inclusion. This sets the stage for readers to meet 26 kids showing us their dance moves.

"Ari loves to arabesque. They hold their pose with ease.
Brody is a break dancer. Brody loves to freeze."

Fast-paced rhyming keeps the flow of text upbeat and rhythmic, and naturally models how to use a wide range of pronouns. There's no room for stereotypes on THIS dance floor with spirited imagery that keeps names, clothes, hair and behavior fresh and diverse. The combination creates a playful and effortless practice to expand ideas about gender while learning the alphabet and makes being inclusive as easy as A-B-C."

Buy here.

Rainbow: A First Book of Pride

Written by Michael Genhart

"A must-have primer for young readers and a great gift for pride events and throughout the year, beautiful colors all together make a rainbow in Rainbow: A First Book of Pride. This is a sweet ode to rainbow families, and an affirming display of a parent's love for their child and a child's love for their parents. With bright colors and joyful families, this book celebrates LGBTQ+ pride and reveals the colorful meaning behind each rainbow stripe. Readers will celebrate the life, healing, light, nature, harmony, and spirit that the rainbows in this book will bring."

Buy here.

Every book or product on Gays With Kids is independently selected by our staff, writers and experts. If you click on a link on our site and buy something, we may earn an affiliate commission.

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