Fun

This Gay Dad Takes 'Twinning' to a Whole New Level

With his husband away on work, Danny Maffia was put on twin duty and filmed the experience for our viewing pleasure.

Danny Maffia and his husband Justin DeMartin became dads to twins after a three failed adoptions and two scams (read their story here). And not only did they get their family's happy ending, they are also winning at this whole twin thing!

Recently, while Justin was away for various work conferences, Danny was left holding the fort. For some fun, he decided to film his nightly routine with the twins. Remaining cool, calm and collected, in the video Danny appears to stay one step ahead of his twins at all times. Bravo, dad!

Danny was quick to follow up in his Instagram post that this was a very tame night in comparison to what it can usually be. Tame or not, Danny shows us how it's done. Our hats are off to you!

Show Comments ()
Gay Dad Life

David Burtka's Cookbook to Offer Glimpse of Family Life With Neil Patrick Harris and Kids

David Burtka recently gave an interview with People Magazine about his new cookbook, "Life is a Party," which hits shelves on April 16th

David Burtka's new cookbook, "Life is a Party" slated to hit shelves on April 16th, will offer a look at life with his husband Neil Patrick Harris and their 8-year-old twins, Harper and Gideon, according to a recent interview with People Magazine. The book picks up where his Food Network special "Life's a Party with David Burtka" left off in 2016.

"The book gives a glimpse into our world and how we entertain," Burtka, who is a Cordon-Bleu trained chef, told People. "We show our lifestyle with the twins by carving pumpkins for fall, parading around the snow in the winter, and sharing my secrets for throwing an amazing and unforgettable event."


Burtka says he tasting many of the recipes that made the cut in the book out on his twins first. "It was lots of fun, but the kids would ask me, 'tangerine chicken, again?' and 'how many different ways can we eat lemon sole, dad?'"

Read the whole story here and pre-order the book on Amazon here!

Gay Dad Life

Cheyenne Jackson Says He's Loving that "Married With Kids" Life on Larry King

The 'American Horror Story' star sat down with Larry King to talk about his success, his siblings, and family life.

During an interview with Larry King, the "American Horror Story" actor Cheyenne Jackson spoke about what it's like being a married man with twins. "It is the best," he said.

He also mentioned that he and his husband, Jason Landau, have slightly different parenting approaches. "We definitely take different roles, naturally," he said. "I am a little bit more of a worrier. I'm a little bit more of, I guess, the mom, in terms of I'm very, very emotional and very tactile – the kids are just always on me. But I'm also more of a disciplinarian than Jason. He plays really crazy and wild with them and I'm always worried about them banging their heads against the wall. I like a really super tight schedule, and he's like, 'Let's just go with it, they're fine.'"

"A typical marriage," said King, who then asked if he and Landau had hoped to have twins.

"Yeah, well they encourage you to put two in just in the hopes that one will be a successful pregnancy. And both did."

See the whole clip here:


'American Horror Story' Star Cheyenne Jackson Talks Overcoming Addiction & Becoming a Father www.youtube.com

Personal Essays by Gay Dads

Why I Pursued Surrogacy as a Single Gay Man

Joseph writes about the events in his life that led him to choose surrogacy as his path to parenthood as a single gay man.

I don't even know where to begin. When people say lost for words, I never truly understood it until Friday, April 19, 2018. Email notification, "Test results. Positive. Congrats." Four words that completely changed my life forever.

Keep reading... Show less
Change the World

Gay Dads Featured in Enfamil Commercial

A new ad for Enfamil showcases two gay men talking about their daughter.

The best kind of inclusion is when you're not singled out but instead included right along with everyone else. This kind inclusion inspires others to pursue their own dreams and desires, just like any one else. As part of our popular culture, we know that brands are uniquely suited to inspire us in this way.

Keep reading... Show less
Gay Dad Life

Cooking with Kids: An Interview with David Burtka

David Burtka sits down with us to talk about his new book "Life is a Party."

When you're a young couple it's easy to order in or dine out on a daily basis, but when the kids come along, spending time in the kitchen to prepare nutritious and healthy meals for them can become a problem for some dads. We turned to gay dad and celebrity chef David Burtka who just published his debut recipe book Life is a Party, to get some advice, inspiration, and support as we take our baby steps in the kitchen.

Keep reading... Show less
Politics

Daughter of Married Gay Couple Who Used Surrogacy Abroad Isn't Citizen, Says U.S. State Department

A decades-old law can be used to discriminate against gay couples who use surrogacy abroad.

James Derek Mize and his husband Jonathan Gregg are both American citizens, but their daughter, born via a surrogate, may not be, at least according to the U.S. State Department.

The New York Times took an in-depth look at this case in a piece that ran in the paper yesterday. While James was born and raised in the U.S, his husband Jonathan was originally born in Britain. That may be enough, according to the State Department, to deny their daughter citizenship.

"We're both Americans; we're married," James told the New York Times. "We just found it really hard to believe that we could have a child that wouldn't be able to be in our country."

According to decades-old immigration law, a child born abroad must have a biological connection to a parent that is a U.S. citizen in order to be eligible to receive citizenship upon birth. Children born via surrogacy are determined to be "out of wedlock," according to the Times report," which then requires a more onerous process to qualify for citizenship, such as demonstrating that a biological parent is not only an American citizen, but has spent at least five years in the country.

The intent of the law, which dates back to the 1950s, was to prevent people from claiming, falsely, that they are the children of U.S. parents. But LGBTQ advocates argue this archaic policy is being used intentionally to discriminates against same-sex couples, who often have to rely on donors, IVF and surrogacy in order to have biologically children, and are thus held to a higher standard.

"This is where our life is. This is where our jobs are," James told the Times. "Our daughter can't be here, but she has no one else to care for her."

Read the whole story here.


Popular

Couple That Met at the Gym Now Spotting Each Other Through Fatherhood

How two real New-Yorkers became two soft-hearted dads

This article is part of our family feature series with Circle Surrogacy, a surrogacy agency that has been helping LGBTQ+ singles and couples realize their dream of parenthood for the past 20 years.

Byron and Matthew Slosar, both 41, met ten years ago at one of New York City's Equinox gyms. "I asked him for a spot on the bench press," smiled Byron. The couple were married September 22, 2012.

Surrogacy was always the way Byron and Matthew wanted to become parents. They chose to wait and become dads later in life, until they had established careers and the financial means to pursue their chosen path.

They signed with Circle Surrogacy after interviewing a few agencies. "We immediately connected with their entire staff, particularly Anne Watson who lovingly dealt with my healthy neuroses on the daily for 1.5 years," said Byron. "They definitely personalized the service and helped us understand all 2,000 moving parts." The dads-to-be were also very impressed with how much emotional support they received from Circle.

Keep reading... Show less

Fatherhood, the gay way

Get the latest from Gays With Kids delivered to your inbox!

Follow Gays With Kids

Powered by RebelMouse