Gay Dad Life

"Fridays with Fitz": A New Kid's Book Based Upon the Son of These Two Dads

Tracey Wimperly, author of the new children's book, said she hopes to give a more honest portrayal of the role grandparents play in the lives of children.

Guest post Tracey Wimperly

I've recently written a children's picture book (aimed at 2-4 year olds) called "Fridays with Fitz: Fitz Goes to the Pool." Every Friday - when his two dads go to work - Fitz and his grandparents (my husband, Steve and I) head off on an adventure. Through the eyes of a curious and energetic 3 year old, even ordinary adventures, like riding the bus or foraging for fungus in the forest can be fun and magical.



I was inspired to write this tale (the first of many in a series, I hope) because I wanted to offer up a different, more realistic portrayal of grandparents than is typically depicted in children's literature. The consistently unflattering stereotype is that we're elderly, sedentary, and not actively involved in raising our grandchildren. The reality for us - and most of our peers - is that we are highly engaged in the lives of our grandchildren - as extended members of the childcare team - and we're definitely active and young-at-heart.

"Fridays with Fitz" subtly introduces a broader notion of diversity: Fitz just happens to have a Daddy and a Papa. This is not a gay parenting book - there are plenty of good books available on that topic. Instead, it's a story of a kid doing kid things with his grandparents along for the ride. His dads simply show up from time to time. I want to represent and normalize queer families for pre-schoolers.

My hope is that "Fridays with Fitz" will encourage conversations about connection, intergenerational relationships and what it means to be a family.

"Fridays with Fitz" is available for purchase on both Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

Author's husband, Steve Wimperly, Tracey Wimperly, Fitzgerald (Fitz) Hinton-Parkes, Craig Parkes and Matthew Hinton.

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A Gift Guide for LGBTQ Inclusive Children's Books

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Read more about Karamo's fascinating path to becoming a gay dad here, and then check out the video below that delves deeper into the inspiration behind "You Are Perfectly Designed," available on Amazon.



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