Change the World

The American Bar Association Passes Resolution in Support of LGBTQ Parents

The resolution will allow the American Bar Association to further its advocacy in support of LGBTQ parents

According to an article in Pride Source, the American Bar Association recently just passed a resolution in support of LGBTQ parents. The move came in response to the continuing trend of "religious freedom" bills in the states across the country, which make it legal for state-licensed child welfare agencies to discriminate against prospective LGBTQ parents.

The resolution recognizes that, despite the Supreme Court's ruling in 2015 legalizing same-sex marriage, LGBTQ people still face discriminatory practices and policies. As the article notes, so-called "religious exemption" bills have been passed in North Dakota, Virginia, Michigan, Mississippi, South Dakota, Alabama, Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas and South Carolina.

The resolution states that "any discriminatory law which restricts an LGBT individual's right to parent not only disregards these precedents, but also contradicts longstanding research. Decades of medical, psychological, sociological, and developmental research overwhelmingly conclude that sexual orientation has no bearing on an individual's ability to be a fit parent. This resolution therefore reaffirms the equal parenting rights of LGBT individuals."

By passing the resolution, the ABA is able to position itself to further advocacy in support of LGBTQ parents in front of policymakers, courts, and other organizations. "The policy would also allow the ABA to directly advocate on behalf of LGBT families and make clear its stance that laws which permit discrimination against LGBT individuals are unconstitutional."

Read the full article here.

Change the World

1 in 8 Adoption in the U.K. By Same-Sex Couples, According to New Stats

According to data recently released by the Department of Education in the U.K., 450 of the 3,820 adoption in 2018 were by same-sex couples

A record-breaking one in eight adoptions are completed by same-sex couples in England, according to the country's Department for Education, and a recent write up in Gay Star News. Specifically, 450 of the 3,820 adoption that have occurred in 2018 so far have been completed by same-sex couples.

The rate has been increasing year of year. This year, nearly 12% of adoptions were completed by same-sex couple, whereas the rate was 9.6% in 2016 and 8.4% in 2015.

"LGBT+ people can bring fantastic parenting skills to their adopted children," Tor Docherty Chief Executive of New Family Social told Gay Star News. "We're thrilled to see agencies consistently recognising that LGBT+ people pay a key role in helping transform the lives of our most vulnerable children."

Read the full story here.

Gay Dad Life

Son of Gay Dad Pens Article in Vice About Accidentally Finding Out About His Father's Sexuality

Julien cried when his father first came out, a moment he's always regretted. But he's found multiple opportunities to show his support since.

In an article for Vice Netherlands, Julien Goyet speaks about the experience of learning about his father's sexuality by accident, when his younger brother heard him repeatedly saying the word "gay" on the phone. When his dad confirmed it was true, Julian says he burst into tears. Though he was just a young boy at the time, it's a moment he's nonetheless always regretted.

"Through the years, I've often asked myself why I did that – why I couldn't have been more understanding. Maybe it was because I realised then and there that it would mean my parents were never getting back together."

Julien continues by saying he's thankful for the multiple opportunities he's had since to make up for that moment.

"Thankfully, four years after he came out to us, he told us about a secret boyfriend he'd had for a while, and we were nothing but happy for him," he wrote. "I can remember the moment he showed me a picture of his partner. It was a Saturday afternoon and he'd called me up to his office in the attic. I went upstairs and found my father behind his computer. On the screen appeared a picture of a handsome man, sitting in a cafe. "That's him," he said, with what I'm pretty sure was pride in his voice. It was weird to see the man my father had fallen in love with – he was handsome and cool, and, thankfully, I didn't feel the urge to cry this time. My father, now more comfortable in his sexuality, asked if I wanted to meet his partner."

With his mother remarried to another man and his father happily partnered, Julien concludes by saying, "now, I have two stepdads. We all celebrate Christmas together. Now and again my father and I have dinner at a restaurant in Amsterdam where burgers are named after drag queens, and he sometimes sends me selfies when he's partying at the Pride parade. I once tagged along with him to his favourite gay bar, where I met all the friends he's made there over the years. It's a place he comes often, and I had no idea it existed all that time. I'm happy that's changed."

Read the full moving essay here.







Above all, I wondered what it would be like to see my father kissing another man. That's happened a couple of times now and it actually feels just the same as when you see your own parents kiss in public – incredibly awkward but also kind of sweet. I'm happy he feels free to do so in his own home now. It's like he's been liberated. Now I wish he had done all this a lot sooner. But he told us he didn't want to confuse us, and he would have gone about it the same way if he had had a new girlfriend. "A divorce, a new stepdad, your father coming out – it all seemed a bit much for you kids," he said.

Now, I have two stepdads. We all celebrate Christmas together. Now and again my father and I have dinner at a restaurant in Amsterdam where burgers are named after drag queens, and he sometimes sends me selfies when he's partying at the Pride parade. I once tagged along with him to his favourite gay bar, where I met all the friends he's made there over the years. It's a place he comes often, and I had no idea it existed all that time. I'm happy that's changed.

Gay Dad Life

Keep Your Little Ones Eating Healthy During the Holidays

David and Danny, founders of Kekoa Foods, share some tips for how to keep your tots healthy and happy during the holidays

Meet David and Danny fathers and founders of Kekoa Foods sharing some tips on how to keep your little ones eating their healthy vegetables during the hecticness of the holidays.

Keep Your Little Ones Eating Healthy Vegetables During the Holidays youtu.be

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Change the World

In a First, Two Male Mice Make Offspring Without Female DNA

Thanks to advances in gene editing and stem cells, scientists in China helped two male mice create offspring together, without any female DNA.

Thanks to advances in gene editing and stem cells, scientists in China helped two male mice create offspring together, without any female DNA. The feat had already been accomplished with two female mice, but this latest advancement marks the first time two male mice have created offspring that were carried to full term.

This marks a major advancement, but it's not time to start lining up at your local fertility clinic just yet, guys: while the mice pups born from two females were healthy, and were even able to conceive their own offspring, those born to two male pups died shortly after their birth.

A recent article in National Geographic helps explain why the feat is more difficult with makes. One of the main barriers is due to a process called "imprinting," during the development of sperm and eggs, when "tags" attach to our chromosomes. In mammals, these tags vary by sex.

"For female mouse pairs, they had to delete three locations to get healthy young," according to the article. "For male mouse pairs, they had to snip seven regions."

For the female pups, snipping just these three regions allowed the pups to grow at a normal rate. Snipping the seven regions in males allows the babies to develop to full term, but it is not enough, yet, to allow the offspring to live much past birth.

An additional barrier: to make an individual, you have to have an egg. "Males don't have eggs," a developmental biologist helpfully points out in the piece.

Read the full article here.

Coming Out

Gay Dads Share Their Coming Out Stories for National Coming Out Day

We asked several gay dads to share their coming out stories in honor of National Coming Out Day, whose stories are heartwarming, instructive, and everything in between

As we celebrate National Coming Out Day, we look at some of the coming out stories of dads in our community. Their stories are as heartwarming as they are instructive for anyone looking for some advice on navigating the difficult, but empowering, coming out process.

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Gay Dad Photo Essays

These Gay Dads and Their Kids Are Ready for Back-to-School Day! (Or Are They?)

These gay dads were smart enough to snap some back-to-school pics with their kids *before* the waterworks started

The first day of school is an emotional time for kids and parents alike...

We say things like, "quit growing up so quickly!"

Our kids say things like, "I don't want summer to end!" To which we mumble under our breath like, "actually, we're not that mad about it! Now I'll have time to watch my soaps."

But seriously, it can be tough to watch your kids board the school bus for the first time each year. If we're lucky, we're able to wait til after they've left before we break down sobbing inconsolably. And if we're smart, we even remember, like these guys did, to snap a couple of family pics before the waterworks kick in... Send your own first day of school pics to dads@gayswithkids.com!

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What to Buy

This Gay Man Wrote a Children's Book After His 3-Year-Old Godson Asked Him to

Dr. Alphonso A. Buie tells Gays With Kids about his new children's book about a gay dad family

Guest post written by Dr. Alphonso A. Buie.

Hello Everyone,

My name is Dr. Alphonso A. Buie. I was born and raised in Chicago, IL but now I reside between Los Angeles, CA and Beijing, China as a Professor in the School of Business. So how did I become a children's book author? Well the answer is simple, a child told me to…

Yes that is right, my godson told me one day at the tender age of 3 years old that I should write books because I am smart. So, with this little guy being my inspiration, I began writing a children's book that I felt could be the beginning of a series that could impact the world, My Two Dads.

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Fatherhood, the gay way

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