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Children's Books Featuring Gay Dad Families

These amazing children's books should be included in every gay dad household.

Foreword by Mark Loewen, author of What Does a Princess Really Look Like? and The True Colors of a Princess Coloring Book: Companion to What Does a Princess Really Look Like?

Every time a child reads a book -or is read to-, they learn something about life, the world, or about themselves. When the main character overcomes a challenge, they ask themselves, "Could I do that?" When a child reads about another child's choices, they wonder if they would do the same.

But what if a child realizes that none of the characters in their books are like them? All children need to see themselves represented in children's books. And, for children with two dads, this is why stories about families like ours are so important.

As part of World Book Day, we celebrate these amazing children's books that should be included in every gay dad household.


***

What Does a Princess Really Look Like?

Chloe dreams of being a ballerina princess. But today she is not practicing her twirls or leaping from room to room. She digs deep in her art drawer to find what she needs to craft her very own princess ballerina. The project quickly turns into more than a simple princess drawing. Chloe realizes that princesses are not just about beautiful hair and sparkly dresses. As her work of art comes to life, she discovers the qualities of character that make up her princess. When she feels inseclure about an imperfection in her art, her dads point out that the personal quirks make her princess unique! And Chloe realizes that she is not too different from the princess she so admires. Princesses can look all kinds of way. What kind of princess are you?


The True Colors of a Princess Coloring Book: Companion to What Does a Princess Really Look Like?

This groundbreaking coloring book encourages kids to think beyond the stereotype of a princess and find strength and courage inside themselves. Kids color along as Chloe tells them that princesses are more than just beauty and glitter. Princesses can also be smart, kind, brave, strong, and brave. Princesses look all kinds of ways They come from any part of the world, and from all kinds of families. The True Colors of a Princess is filled with messages of empowerment, diversity, and equality.


A Family Is a Family Is a Family

When a teacher asks the children in her class to think about what makes their families special, the answers are all different in many ways — but the same in the one way that matters most of all. One child is worried that her family is just too different to explain, but listens as her classmates talk about what makes their families special. One is raised by a grandmother, and another has two dads. One is full of stepsiblings, and another has a new baby. As one by one, her classmates describe who they live with and who loves them — family of every shape, size and every kind of relation — the child realizes that as long as her family is full of caring people, her family is special. A warm and whimsical look at many types of families written by award-winning author Sara O'Leary, A Family is a Family springs to life with quirky and sweet illustrations by Qin Leng.


A Tale of Two Daddies

"A Tale of Two Daddies" is a playground conversation between two children. The boy says he heard that the girl has two dads. The girl says that is right--she has Daddy and Poppa. True to a child's curiosity, practical questions follow: "Which dad helps when your team needs a coach? / Which dad cooks you eggs and toast?" To which she answers: "Daddy is my soccer coach. / Poppa cooks me eggs and toast."


Daddy, Papa and Me

Rhythmic text and illustrations with universal appeal show a toddler spending the day with its daddies. From hide-and-seek to dress-up, then bath time and a kiss goodnight, there's no limit to what a loving family can do together. Share the loving bond between same-sex parents and their children.


My Family: My Two Dads

Lenny follows Jasmine for a school project and learns about her life with her two dads.


The Family Book

"The Family Book" celebrates the love we feel for our families and all the different varieties they come in. Whether you have two moms or two dads, a big family or a small family, a clean family or a messy one, Todd Parr assures readers that no matter what kind of family you have, every family is special in its own unique way.


The Purim Superhero

Nate loves aliens and he really wants to wear an alien costume for Purim, but his friends are all dressing as superheroes and he wants to fit in. What will he do? With the help of his two dads he makes a surprising decision.


Stella Brings the Family

Stella's class is having a Mother's Day celebration, but what's a girl with two daddies to do? It's not that she doesn't have someone who helps her with her homework, or tucks her in at night. Stella has her Papa and Daddy who take care of her, and a whole gaggle of other loved ones who make her feel special and supported every day. She just doesn't have a mom to invite to the party. Fortunately, Stella finds a unique solution to her party problem in this sweet story about love, acceptance, and the true meaning of family


ABC A Family Alphabet Book

Have fun with the kids, moms, dads and pets in this delightful book that celebrates LGBTQ families as it teaches young children the alphabet.


Daddy's Roommate

A young boy discusses his divorced father's new living situation, in which the father and his gay roommate share eating, doing chores, playing, loving, and living


One Dad, Two Dads, Brown Dad, Blue Dads

Two children—one with blue dads, one from a more traditional family—compare notes in this light hearted book about parents who are different. In the end, of course, they discover that blue dads aren't really that different from other dads. Except for one thing.


Everywhere Babies

Every day, everywhere, babies are born. They're kissed and dressed and rocked and fed--and completely adored by the families that love them. With an irresistible rhyming text and delightfully endearing illustrations, this board book is an exuberant celebration of playing, sleeping, crawling, and, of course, very noisy babies doing all the wonderful things babies do best.


The Great Big Book of Families

This fun and fascinating treasury features all kinds of families and their lives together. Each spread showcases one aspect of home life-from houses and holidays, to schools and pets, to feelings and family trees. Ros Asquith's humorous illustrations perfectly complement a charming text from the acclaimed Mary Hoffman; kids will love poring over these pages again and again. A celebration of the diverse fabric of kith and kin the world over, The Great Big Book of Families is a great big treat for every family to share.


My Two Dads and Me

Families with same-sex parents are celebrated in this board book that follows busy dads and their kids throughout their day—eating breakfast, getting dressed, heading out to the park, and settling back in at night with a bubble bath and a good-night lullaby. LGBTQ+ parents and their friends and families will welcome this inclusive and cheerful book that reflects their own lives and family makeup.


Love Makes a Family

Love is baking a special cake. Love is lending a helping hand. Love is reading one more book. In this exuberant board book, many different families are shown in happy activity, from an early-morning wake-up to a kiss before bed. Whether a child has two moms, two dads, one parent, or one of each, this simple preschool read-aloud demonstrates that what's most important in each family's life is the love the family members share.


Some People Have Two Dads

Our society is changing. An increasing number of gay couples are having children through adoption and surrogacy. At some point you should explain to your child about same-gender parents. I have written this book as an educational tool to help people understand that families come in a variety of different combinations. If you can, please buy two books - one for your child and one to give away as a present or donation to a school or library - so that, together, we can educate parents, children and the community and make the world a better place.


My Two Dads Are Amazing!: A book about living with gay dads

Ben is 9 years old and lives with his two dads. There are good things (going on trips, for example) and not-so-good things (such as being made to eat tomatoes) about living with his dads. But they're pretty amazing dads! In this beautifully-illustrated and positive story, Pablo Fernández (author of Becoming Dads) brings a dose of humour to challenging perceptions about non-traditional families.


For books featuring gay dad families created through adoption, check out our list here.

For books featuring gay dad families created through surrogacy, check out our list here.


Every book or product on Gays With Kids is independently selected by our staff, writers and experts. If you click on a link on our site and buy something, we may earn an affiliate commission.

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